Our Technology

Creating Base-load, Zero Emission Power from Wasted Heat

The Clean Cycle containerized solution has been meticulously engineered to be reliable and efficient on a variety of different heat sources. All major components have been assembled into a single package to create an automated machine that generates electricity from nothing other than a hot water or steam loop.

Key Features

Turnkey package

Complete assembly requires only heat input, interconnection, and minor control integration to begin producing electricity.

Simple grid integration

Electricity produced by the generator is conditioned with power electronics to match any grid frequency automatically.

Fully Autonomous

The unit adjusts to the heat provided to it, including startup, adjusting to fluctuating loads, maximizing output, and shut-off when needed.

Low maintenance

Core generating equipment has no gearbox, no oils, no lubricants, no external rotating seals, and does not require manned operation. This reduces operating costs and maximizes investment.

How it Works

Clean Cycle generator

The Clean Cycle is the heart of the containerized solution. The skid, pictured left, includes two brazed plate heat exchangers to transfer the heat from the water or steam to the refrigerant loop. From the heat exchangers, the refrigerant spins the turbine generator enclosed within the Integrated Power Module (IPM). The electricity is conditioned by on-board power electronics before being sent to the grid. The whole process is controlled by a central Controller & PLC.

Integrated Power Module

The IPM is the heart of the Clean Cycle solution. It is a fully enclosed, hermetically sealed module that includes an integrated turbine generator that sits on magnetic bearings. The turbine is automatically controlled in a magnetic field by a Magnetic Bearing Controller as it spins at 27,500 RPM. The turbine generator is self cooled, and there is no oil, lubricants, or gearbox required.

Containerization

The Clean Cycle arrives mounted in the 20ft ISO shipping container that it arrives in. The team has modified the container to have access doors, cut-outs for all necessary pipework to the heat source and condenser. It also has optional coating and salt screen with pressurization fan to prevent corrosion.

Condenser

The standard air condenser uses fans to  cool the vapor refrigerant to a liquid after it leaves the IPM. It automatically communicates with the Clean Cycle unit to determine the optimal fan speeds to maximize output and minimize parasitic losses. The condenser ships separately with a mounting kit so it can be  placed on top of the containerized solution. An epoxy coating is optional for installations near salt water to prevent corrosion. If cooling water is available on site, an optional water cooled heat exchanger mounted inside the container can be used in place of the air condenser.

Heat capture

The most common way to extract the heat energy from an exhaust stream is to use an exhaust gas heat exchanger, similar to the one pictured on the left. In this case, hot exhaust flows over a series of pipes that water is piped through. The water absorbs the heat energy from the exhaust, and then the water (or in some cases steam) can be pumped to the Clean Cycle unit using a closed loop. 

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Our expert staff is ready to help you with your questions and inquiries.

Clean Energy Technologies, Inc.

2990 Redhill Avenue
Costa Mesa, California 92626 U.S.A.
Main Phone: (949) 273-4990

Fax Number: (949) 273-4990